Install warnings

Karsten75 · 2258

Karsten75

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on: December 31, 2009, 02:10:06 pm
Virgil, when I install the game I get a warning that the author is "unknown" or something like that. Also happens for the Map Maker program.  Is this something that you have to pay to fix? I always feel a little better when I install something that has been verified and I don't get warnings like that.

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Mrmcdeath

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Reply #1 on: December 31, 2009, 02:32:58 pm
It just means that your computer doesn't understand where the download came from. This happens a lot when you download things off of the internet. If you purposely downloaded the item then don't worry. If you know where it came from (like creeper world) then don't worry.

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When life gives you lemons make lemonade.
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Unless life also gives you sugar and a cup, your lemonades gonna suck.


Karsten75

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Reply #2 on: December 31, 2009, 02:58:31 pm
It just means that your computer doesn't understand where the download came from. This happens a lot when you download things off of the internet. If you purposely downloaded the item then don't worry. If you know where it came from (like creeper world) then don't worry.

I know that, but the notifications are meant to reassure users. I always think a few times before I install stuff with a warning.

"Any leftover cabbage can and will be mixed with mayo"
   - Cole's Law


Mrmcdeath

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Reply #3 on: December 31, 2009, 03:30:19 pm
It usually just depends on whether or not you downloaded it on purpose AKA a game or a movie or something.

Life Lesson #1
When life gives you lemons make lemonade.
Life Lesson #2
Unless life also gives you sugar and a cup, your lemonades gonna suck.


knucracker

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Reply #4 on: December 31, 2009, 04:55:37 pm
I could buy a certificate from one of the cert authorities and sign the game.  They cost a really large annual fee, but that isn't the reason I didn't digitally sign it.  Every time the certificate expires I would have to re-sign the game with a new cert, I'd have to do this mess where I still have the old cert before I could do that.  I knew that I would probably be producing updates to the game (perhaps more than a year after the initial release), so I just didn't want to go through the hassle to keep up with it.... if I didn't manage to keep up with it then I'd have to sign with a brand new certificate... and this would mean that people wouldn't be able to just install a patch.  They'd have to uninstall the old game first then install the new game.  This is because signing with a new cert would make air think the patch was an entirely new application and it would refuse to install a new app to the same directory as the existing old app.

It's basically an expensive complicated mess that is hard to manage over a time frame of years.  Now putting a cert on a website is no big deal.... but signing an AIR app and releasing patches more than a year later was just a mess I didn't really want to keep up with.



Karsten75

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Reply #5 on: December 31, 2009, 09:56:10 pm
I could buy a certificate from one of the cert authorities and sign the game.  They cost a really large annual fee, but that isn't the reason I didn't digitally sign it.  Every time the certificate expires I would have to re-sign the game with a new cert, I'd have to do this mess where I still have the old cert before I could do that.  I knew that I would probably be producing updates to the game (perhaps more than a year after the initial release), so I just didn't want to go through the hassle to keep up with it.... if I didn't manage to keep up with it then I'd have to sign with a brand new certificate... and this would mean that people wouldn't be able to just install a patch.  They'd have to uninstall the old game first then install the new game.  This is because signing with a new cert would make air think the patch was an entirely new application and it would refuse to install a new app to the same directory as the existing old app.

It's basically an expensive complicated mess that is hard to manage over a time frame of years.  Now putting a cert on a website is no big deal.... but signing an AIR app and releasing patches more than a year later was just a mess I didn't really want to keep up with.

I thought that there might have been a reason like that. You may, however want to put up an info screen for users so they know that it will happen. Not a priority, just a suggestion.

"Any leftover cabbage can and will be mixed with mayo"
   - Cole's Law