Knuckle Cracker

Misc. => Builder's Corner => Topic started by: lich98 on July 09, 2013, 12:07:57 am

Title: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 09, 2013, 12:07:57 am
I'm looking to try to learn to build PCs, I watched a few youtube videos on it and sorta randomly through this list of parts together, would they even work or be halfway decient? I made two sets, I know the second doesn't include a case I didn't get around to adding one.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: CobraKill on July 09, 2013, 12:41:55 am
1st Build: It needs a powerful discrete graphics card. That system would be heavily bottlenecked by the lack of a strong GPU.

2nd Build: Wow. If you can afford it. It would be a blazing system. However, a GTX Titan would be beat by a cheaper NVIDIA GeForce 690 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007ZRO3U4/ref=redir_mdp_mobileGeForce 690) or doing two NVIDIA GeForce 770 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00CU9GOAE/ref=redir_mdp_mobile) in SLI. would be best and save you a little bit of money. For the best performance though a NVIDIA GeForce 780 in SLI would run you up $1500; $300 more then the TITAN. I would personally do 770's in SLI.

EDIT: Taking another look, your Motherboard is incompatible with the CPU. You need to look for one with the Z87 Chipset and Socket LGA 1150 and if do the 770 Sli the motherboard must be SLI compatible. Also, your Power Supply might not be strong enough. But I'm not good at gauging that.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 09, 2013, 12:59:08 am
I'm looking to try to learn to build PCs, I watched a few youtube videos on it and sorta randomly through this list of parts together, would they even work or be halfway decient? I made two sets, I know the second doesn't include a case I didn't get around to adding one.

You really didn't put much thought into it, so I didn't either. :)

If you want a comparison, use side-by side descriptions including the name of the component.

I did not ice that you priced everything from Amazon. That can be expensive. Newegg.com is much cheaper. For the BitFenix Prodigy case, they go for about $80 at Newegg.

I built a PC in a BitFenix Prodigy case in March. Once you have a list of descriptive parts, I'll look it over. There were a few things I noticed with that case that would make me hesitate to recommend it for anyone.

Also consider using a non-stock  cooler. I didn't spend enough time on your lists to see if you had one. Everybody these days use closed-loop water cooling. Much quieter and more efficient.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 09, 2013, 01:41:02 am
Everybody these days use closed-loop water cooling. Much quieter and more efficient.

*Has three main fans and three smaller fans running in case*
Guess I'm nobody. ::)

On another note, I have no clue how water cooling works.
Like, how does it...do the...whatever it does...without like...doing what water does to electric stuff..? :D
Not that I need it, but how much would it cost on average, and how hard would it be to install yourself?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: asmussen on July 09, 2013, 04:01:26 am
Everybody these days use closed-loop water cooling. Much quieter and more efficient.

*Has three main fans and three smaller fans running in case*
Guess I'm nobody. ::)

On another note, I have no clue how water cooling works.
Like, how does it...do the...whatever it does...without like...doing what water does to electric stuff..? :D
Not that I need it, but how much would it cost on average, and how hard would it be to install yourself?

The water never actually comes in contact with the electrical components. It runs through a closed loop between a block that sits on top of the CPU where a heatsink/fan combo would normally be attached, and a radiator with fans that blow across it. Here's an example of one:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181032
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: dlbushman on July 09, 2013, 09:49:43 am
This is the main resource I used when I built mine about a year ago:
http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1317827-Patch-5-4-Legendary-Cloak-Effects-Blue-Tweets-Setup-of-the-Month-News-Recap (http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1317827-Patch-5-4-Legendary-Cloak-Effects-Blue-Tweets-Setup-of-the-Month-News-Recap)

I used to play WoW quite a bit, and I still frequent MMO-Champion.  In that news post is their 'Setup of the Month' about halfway down.  It goes through 4 different levels of computing power/price.  Obviously that isn't the exact post I used, but they do it about every month, so it does list the most recent hardware.  Following that list will at least get you a motherboard and components that will all work.  Then after a little more research into what you need/want, and pricing through different sites, you should be in good shape.  I ended up buying half of it from Amazon and half of it from Newegg.  I bought my monitor from Best Buy, I like to actually look at that sort of thing before I buy it.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 09, 2013, 05:38:29 pm
This is the main resource I used when I built mine about a year ago:
http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1317827-Patch-5-4-Legendary-Cloak-Effects-Blue-Tweets-Setup-of-the-Month-News-Recap (http://www.mmo-champion.com/threads/1317827-Patch-5-4-Legendary-Cloak-Effects-Blue-Tweets-Setup-of-the-Month-News-Recap)

I used to play WoW quite a bit, and I still frequent MMO-Champion.  In that news post is their 'Setup of the Month' about halfway down.  It goes through 4 different levels of computing power/price.  Obviously that isn't the exact post I used, but they do it about every month, so it does list the most recent hardware.  Following that list will at least get you a motherboard and components that will all work.  Then after a little more research into what you need/want, and pricing through different sites, you should be in good shape.  I ended up buying half of it from Amazon and half of it from Newegg.  I bought my monitor from Best Buy, I like to actually look at that sort of thing before I buy it.

I'd say my real budget would be more like $1000 if I could even get that much. I'll have to play around with compatable parts, and see what I can get with what I want to do... I need something that can render videos, and play games better, I struggle to maintain 30fps on most CW2 maps with our current home PC, it is time for an upgrade on that computer. I won't be allowed to brake the bank either, if I even get to build it.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 09, 2013, 06:49:15 pm
There is an absolutely awesome deal on $100 off a motherboard and 16GB memory combo on Newegg.

When I build a new computer I start collecting parts over about 2-3 months as the deals come on.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 09, 2013, 07:46:22 pm
There is an absolutely awesome deal on $100 off a motherboard and 16GB memory combo on Newegg.

When I build a new computer I start collecting parts over about 2-3 months as the deals come on.

I can't start getting stuff yet either, Mainly just trying to see what I could get on a relitivly small budget because we do need a better home PC desktop. Not sure if my parents would trust me with building a computer though
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 09, 2013, 08:20:36 pm
Two new trys what do you think of them
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 10, 2013, 01:13:57 am
Here's my problem: You have the first line as

Case   55    URL to Amazon.

Thing is I don't find Amazon the best price for most computer components. I use Newegg, NCIX, MicroCenter, Tiger Direct, etc.  It would be really helpful if you actually stated the make and model of the case, eg: BitFenix Prodigy or Fractal Design Arc Midi. I know quite a few cases and then don't have to go look them up on Amazon and then click over to Newegg to compare prices.

I will look at your list though. Comments to follow:
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 10, 2013, 02:11:20 am
Your Budget build:

The case does not support front USB 3.0 ports.
If you can live with a white case, it's for sale at Newegg for $25 after a rebate.

I usually prefer a sturdy build, and I can't tell with this one. You need to be careful, there are multiple 210 models at Newegg, SOme specify a "painted interior" others do not. It is a highly rated case, so it may be that one of the 210 models do have USB 3.0. Amazon does not tell you things like that, which is one of the reasons I don't shop at Amazon for PC components.

IMHO the lowest you should go with a PSU on a new build is probably 650W. I like to overshoot, and get a gold or platinum rated one. That way it runs cool and quiet. Get a modular PSU, then you reduce cable clutter. Most people underestimate the importance of a good PSU.

The CPU seems to be incredible good value for money. Not a top-of the line performer, but price-wise you can't beat it. I would however spend more and get a much better performer.  IMHO there are only tow choices right now if you plan to play games etc.

Either the i5-3570K or the i5-4670K. It's $100 more than yours, but I'd not skimp on that.

If the processor comes with a stock fan, I would not buy another fan-based CPU cooler. I'd go with the processor stock fan until I can get a water-loop cooler.

Again, the same memory is cheaper at Newegg. I would not buy 4GB modules. I prefer 8BG modules. But if you are sure you will not for the life of the PC need more that 16GB, go for it. I think a gaming PC probably needs 16GB or so. Even if you start with 8 now and buy 8 more later.

As for the motherboard, again there is a rebate at Newegg. THere are also similarly-prices Asus and ASRock motherboards that have a very good reputation. I have a gigabyte and an MSI board, but I really like my new ASRock motherboard.

Video card is awesome.

In your notes you said 2TB hard drive, but the model you link to is a 1TB model.

DVD drives.. meh.

Keyboard, mouse and speakers.. .meh  I have a pair of $10 USB speakers and they work fine. I have a chaep Microsoft mouse and an expensive mechanical keyboard.

The TV is not a good gaming monitor. ALso pay attention to the dot pitch. That is the distance between the pixels (and hence the size of the pixels) if you go to an over-large monitor, then it starts to appear grainy.  A good way to see what I mean is to go to a store that sells TVs.  Look at the largest model they sell with 720p vertical.  Look at the picture carefully. Then look at the same size with 1080P.

That's all I can do for now.  Good start on your list, but you should rethink a few things. Price from Newegg and you'll probably save $10 on almost every component.  Buy from NCIX and then over $100 they ship for free. But I hate to look at things on the NCIX site, they are even worse than Amazon for comparing products.

Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 10, 2013, 07:02:45 pm
Your Budget build:

The case does not support front USB 3.0 ports.
If you can live with a white case, it's for sale at Newegg for $25 after a rebate.

I usually prefer a sturdy build, and I can't tell with this one. You need to be careful, there are multiple 210 models at Newegg, SOme specify a "painted interior" others do not. It is a highly rated case, so it may be that one of the 210 models do have USB 3.0. Amazon does not tell you things like that, which is one of the reasons I don't shop at Amazon for PC components.

IMHO the lowest you should go with a PSU on a new build is probably 650W. I like to overshoot, and get a gold or platinum rated one. That way it runs cool and quiet. Get a modular PSU, then you reduce cable clutter. Most people underestimate the importance of a good PSU.

The CPU seems to be incredible good value for money. Not a top-of the line performer, but price-wise you can't beat it. I would however spend more and get a much better performer.  IMHO there are only tow choices right now if you plan to play games etc.

Either the i5-3570K or the i5-4670K. It's $100 more than yours, but I'd not skimp on that.

If the processor comes with a stock fan, I would not buy another fan-based CPU cooler. I'd go with the processor stock fan until I can get a water-loop cooler.

Again, the same memory is cheaper at Newegg. I would not buy 4GB modules. I prefer 8BG modules. But if you are sure you will not for the life of the PC need more that 16GB, go for it. I think a gaming PC probably needs 16GB or so. Even if you start with 8 now and buy 8 more later.

As for the motherboard, again there is a rebate at Newegg. THere are also similarly-prices Asus and ASRock motherboards that have a very good reputation. I have a gigabyte and an MSI board, but I really like my new ASRock motherboard.

Video card is awesome.

In your notes you said 2TB hard drive, but the model you link to is a 1TB model.

DVD drives.. meh.

Keyboard, mouse and speakers.. .meh  I have a pair of $10 USB speakers and they work fine. I have a chaep Microsoft mouse and an expensive mechanical keyboard.

The TV is not a good gaming monitor. ALso pay attention to the dot pitch. That is the distance between the pixels (and hence the size of the pixels) if you go to an over-large monitor, then it starts to appear grainy.  A good way to see what I mean is to go to a store that sells TVs.  Look at the largest model they sell with 720p vertical.  Look at the picture carefully. Then look at the same size with 1080P.

That's all I can do for now.  Good start on your list, but you should rethink a few things. Price from Newegg and you'll probably save $10 on almost every component.  Buy from NCIX and then over $100 they ship for free. But I hate to look at things on the NCIX site, they are even worse than Amazon for comparing products.



Which one of the two builds was this one on? And I wish ot use the computer to render video files as well as play games on.

Also: Budget high, save money, I'd rather have more money that I need to for the build than not, I did forget to include an operating system in those builds, I'd go with Windows 7 if they still sell that mainly because 8 is really bad for a computer
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 10, 2013, 07:15:02 pm

Which one of the two builds was this one on? And I wish ot use the computer to render video files as well as play games on.




What does the first line of my quoted post say?  :)

I did notice that you forgot the OS but it slipped my mind. I'm not used to posting such long posts. Windows 7 is still available. You can get Home Premium OEM for around %99-100.

And yes, one should budget high, but being off by 10% if one has to ask for money may make it more difficult.  I usually look at the lowest set of standard prices and then over a few months look for deals that drive the price a little lower.

The most worrisome thing about you quoting Amazon is that you can't compare components on Amazon. But hey, go ahead. It's your build. :)
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 10, 2013, 07:31:15 pm
Have a look at this build and I will exclude the Operating System from the builds at the moment.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 10, 2013, 08:49:45 pm
Quick looks, I'd save money by getting the i5-4760 instead of the +$100 for the i7. I'd not get a Gigabyte motherboard. The same combo deals are available on ASRock  and Asus motherboards - That may just be my preference, but some guy I know who builds loads of PCs agrees with me. You linked a $770 graphics card, not the $360 version you have in your list. I thought the card you had in the budget build was pretty awesome. Monitors, I'd never buy a 1920x1080 monitor, but that's just me, our family PC has one and it's convenient when I link that to the TV to watch movies and shows.  Monitors are a whole different kettle of fish. Can write books just about those, but the one you listed is probably as good as any of 10 in that price bracket. Not high-end though. IPS monitors  are higher-end.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 10, 2013, 10:00:35 pm
Quick looks, I'd save money by getting the i5-4760 instead of the +$100 for the i7. I'd not get a Gigabyte motherboard. The same combo deals are available on ASRock  and Asus motherboards - That may just be my preference, but some guy I know who builds loads of PCs agrees with me. You linked a $770 graphics card, not the $360 version you have in your list. I thought the card you had in the budget build was pretty awesome. Monitors, I'd never buy a 1920x1080 monitor, but that's just me, our family PC has one and it's convenient when I link that to the TV to watch movies and shows.  Monitors are a whole different kettle of fish. Can write books just about those, but the one you listed is probably as good as any of 10 in that price bracket. Not high-end though. IPS monitors  are higher-end.

Would you be able to link me a monitor you recommend?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 11, 2013, 12:01:15 am
The best bang for the buck is this:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/330810935112?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

There are some that you can get for <$400.

But if you are a serious gamer, playing FPS games, then you should look at the 120 Hz refresh rate monitors. For 1920x1080, not ore than 24 inch. If you go over that you need a higher resolution.

I personally have a 5ms Asus Proart PA248Q  monitor 1920x1200. But that was accidental. If I didn't get stuck with it I'd have the 27" Crossover I linked you above. Virgil has a 2560x1440 Asus I believe. Madmag might be interesting to ask him what he has, I don't recall anymore.

Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 11, 2013, 12:22:08 am
I think this seems to be a good build.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 11, 2013, 09:13:26 am
A few things I'd change. COnsider this cooler: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103179  THe reason is that is is PWM controlled, so the CPU will send signals to the 4-pin PWM fan plug to control the speed. When idle, the fans will rotate slowly, keeping the noise down. Note that there are other, similar models and you can look around a bit to find one that is the best for you.

If you have a SSD for your main drive, save some coin and get this cheaper 2TB drive. Right now you can get a combo on it with a DVD burner for for $112. THe DVD burner adds effectively $7 to the price. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136891

That SSD is the top-in-class as far as I know. Again, if you want to save a bit you can get the non-Pro version. but go ahead if you wish.

The monitor is pretty neat as well. If you are into fast FPS games, you may want to spend a little more time to look for one (I spent maybe 4 months selecting a monitor) - way more than for any other component.  But the one in your list is certainly a high-class monitor. If you were to look more, look for one that has 120Hz refresh and maybe a faster response time gtg (grey-to-grey).  Other than that, there is really no issues at all.

Don't buy Windows Ultimate. It's a standing joke when we see a PC with that OS that is must be pirated, since nobody will buy it. There is very little that recommends it over the Standard Home Premium and you can save $100. If you ever want to, you can do the MS anytime upgrade from within Windows. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986

There is one more  thing, that I learned from experience.  My first (or was it second?) I went the full monty on LED fans, case lights and all that stuff. ANd nobody looks at it after a week at the most. Then later on, it serves to show you how much dirt is in the case (maybe not a bad thing). :)

My last two build have focused on cool and quiet. I get sound-insulated cases preferably without a side window. I focus on PWM fans for the case and the CPU. I very much like the Vortex series of fans, but I seem to remember that later on I found better fans. Someone that made fans that were designed differently depending on whether they had to push a lot of air free-flowing or if they had to create air pressure to force air through a radiator. Anyway. Now I have these dark, black boxes with no lights showing, one you can't hear if you sitting next to it, the other you can't hear from 6-10 feet away.

I also look for cases that have easily-removable filters to help keep the dust out. Not that it helps much, this build I have is a month old and when I opened it yesterday to add something, there was already a cobweb in it. :( But there was so much dust on the filter, it must have kept some crud out of the case.

I think the build you have now is pretty impressive. Can I have one? :P
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 11, 2013, 06:22:39 pm
I changed the operating system and the Cooling System in this build, If my parents will give me the money for it I will try to build it and let you all know how it performs. Got a good software to use to test a benchmark on the machine? Ofc if I get to build it :D
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 11, 2013, 07:38:23 pm
Looks impressive - and a lot cheaper than your initial build. :)

You can benchmark it using Passmark software: http://www.passmark.com/products/pt.htm then you can add to the benchmarks on the Internet.

Not really sure why you swapped out the modular PSU for a non-modular one, you will regret the cable clutter. You can test size your PSU on the Newegg site.

And I don't see a liquid cooler? You dropped that off?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 11, 2013, 08:25:24 pm
Looks impressive - and a lot cheaper than your initial build. :)

You can benchmark it using Passmark software: http://www.passmark.com/products/pt.htm then you can add to the benchmarks on the Internet.

Not really sure why you swapped out the modular PSU for a non-modular one, you will regret the cable clutter. You can test size your PSU on the Newegg site.

And I don't see a liquid cooler? You dropped that off?

Hm, no I think I need to double check that cart then i swore I chose a Modular PSU and a Liquid Cooler, seems they didn't get added, here is the new cart.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 11, 2013, 08:44:11 pm
Let me know how Rosewill PSU works out. They are a new, agressive components maker and I've got a few of their components, but not a PSU or case.

I think it's wise to go with the 25mm radiator on the cooler, rather than the 38mm of the newer version. I'd be worried about space in my case, although you get better cooling performance with the 38mm unit, which is why they upgraded it.

Overall, I think it is a fantastic build. Hope you manage to pull it off. Little different from what I'd build today, but not that different whan an early build I'd do today.  I'm kind of jealous, and I barely finished this PC a month ago.  :)

Have fun.


Edit: Ouch! I just looked at the price and it's up by about $400 from the previous IIRC? Wow!  :o

Make sure you submit all the rebate requests.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 11, 2013, 08:45:58 pm
Let me know how Rosewill PSU works out. They are a new, agressive components maker and I've got a few of their components, but not a PSU or case.

I think it's wise to go with the 25mm radiator on the cooler, rather than the 38mm of the newer version. I'd be worried about space in my case, although you get better cooling performance with the 38mm unit, which is why they upgraded it.

Overall, I think it is a fantastic build. Hope you manage to pull it off. Little different from what I'd build today, but not that different whan an early build I'd do today.  I'm kind of jealous, and I barely finished this PC a month ago.  :)

Have fun.

Thanks, i'll let you know how it goes
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 11, 2013, 09:21:17 pm
I hope nobody minds my asking here, but what is the advantage for any refresh rate over 60 Hz..?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 11, 2013, 09:57:55 pm
Ultra-keen gamers with good eyes say they can see the difference...

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6963/benq-xl2720t-gaming-monitor-reviewed

Quote
Designed for gaming use, the BenQ puts a lot of weight into its 120 Hz refresh rate. If you havenít used a 120 Hz display before, you really need to do it in person to see the extra fluidity that it offers in comparison to 60 Hz. It isnít something that can be captured in video, since it would be seen on a 60 Hz display, but in person itís impossible to miss. Simple things like a mouse cursor or dragging a window are much more fluid. Playing games, animations and movement are much more fluid than with 60 Hz, and the change is almost instant to notice. Even myself, who is a casual gamer at best, can notice the difference that it makes in fluidity.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 11, 2013, 10:18:24 pm
Ultra-keen gamers with good eyes say they can see the difference...

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6963/benq-xl2720t-gaming-monitor-reviewed

Quote
Designed for gaming use, the BenQ puts a lot of weight into its 120 Hz refresh rate. If you havenít used a 120 Hz display before, you really need to do it in person to see the extra fluidity that it offers in comparison to 60 Hz. It isnít something that can be captured in video, since it would be seen on a 60 Hz display, but in person itís impossible to miss. Simple things like a mouse cursor or dragging a window are much more fluid. Playing games, animations and movement are much more fluid than with 60 Hz, and the change is almost instant to notice. Even myself, who is a casual gamer at best, can notice the difference that it makes in fluidity.

I'll stick with the 60hz for now, A monitor is something easy to upgrade at a later date.

Graudaid, the build cost according to the newegg cart I can see, which I haven't edited puts the build at $1,650.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 13, 2013, 10:34:16 am
I've had a few thoughts about this and I'm wondering if any of this is useful.

If you have never built a computer, do you really want to experiment with a top-of-the line PC if you have no experience building and troubleshooting?

In many ways Blaze's method of upgrading an existing PC is best. It is not as expensive and since one changes only a few components at a time, it is a good training path.

I started like that. My first "upgrade" was to drill extra air holes in the front of a case and add an 80mm fan. (I still have the case in a pile I'm going to throw out some day).

I might have added a video card and a wireless card as well.

Then I got a new case with better airflow and a window. I took that case apart (literally) and painted parts of it in various colors. I even painted the hard drives and optical drives with fluorescent paint! I still have a few of them around to remind me...

Next I built a server with an atom-based CPU and a micro-ATX board for <$500 to see if I could do it. THat was probably the most tricky ever, since it being  consumer components and server OS, drivers was a nightmare. But after that I was set, knowing I could do it. (oh yea, this little guy is still running upstairs, managing our files. :)

After that I decided that dark and quiet was more my thing.

Now I've built quite a few more from the ground up. Two so far this year and a number of case swaps and component swaps or installs.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 13, 2013, 11:55:08 am
I've had a few thoughts about this and I'm wondering if any of this is useful.

If you have never built a computer, do you really want to experiment with a top-of-the line PC if you have no experience building and troubleshooting?

In many ways Blaze's method of upgrading an existing PC is best. It is not as expensive and since one changes only a few components at a time, it is a good training path.

I started like that. My first "upgrade" was to drill extra air holes in the front of a case and add an 80mm fan. (I still have the case in a pile I'm going to throw out some day).

I might have added a video card and a wireless card as well.

Then I got a new case with better airflow and a window. I took that case apart (literally) and painted parts of it in various colors. I even painted the hard drives and optical drives with fluorescent paint! I still have a few of them around to remind me...

Next I built a server with an atom-based CPU and a micro-ATX board for <$500 to see if I could do it. THat was probably the most tricky ever, since it being  consumer components and server OS, drivers was a nightmare. But after that I was set, knowing I could do it. (oh yea, this little guy is still running upstairs, managing our files. :)

After that I decided that dark and quiet was more my thing.

Now I've built quite a few more from the ground up. Two so far this year and a number of case swaps and component swaps or installs.

I'm going to a high school that will have other kids there that I bet have built a computer, the school might even hace a club or something on it. And my dad works in an IT department and has changed parts of our PC before. When in dought I can always ask here as well.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 20, 2013, 09:42:42 am
Got a budget of closer to 13-1400 dollars, Hows this build look? I already have a USB mouse/keyboard to use.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 20, 2013, 05:59:47 pm
I'm out of town. Will look at it when I return.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 21, 2013, 06:38:01 pm
I'm out of town. Will look at it when I return.

Ok, no rush. I won't accually get to build one in a few months minamum, just trying to get used of putting parts together that work...
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 22, 2013, 09:29:59 pm
Hate to steal the thread, but I have a friend who wants a new computer and is intent on building one from scratch.
He is asking me to help and all he has picked out is the case and he doesn't even know what he wants, just that is budget is $700 and that he wants me to shop for him. :'(

The issue is I can only take care of most of it, the issue I have is the motherboard and processor, I don't know how to check if they are compatible or not.
I just need to be taught on that, but if somebody wants to pull up a build for me to show him, within his price range and is able to run a game like SWTOR on medium, that'd be good too. :D
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 22, 2013, 09:45:30 pm
Hate to steal the thread, but I have a friend who wants a new computer and is intent on building one from scratch.
He is asking me to help and all he has picked out is the case and he doesn't even know what he wants, just that is budget is $700 and that he wants me to shop for him. :'(

The issue is I can only take care of most of it, the issue I have is the motherboard and processor, I don't know how to check if they are compatible or not.
I just need to be taught on that, but if somebody wants to pull up a build for me to show him, within his price range and is able to run a game like SWTOR on medium, that'd be good too. :D

Perhaps check this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUVhoixX-uE) Its an AMD Build, not sure if he wanted that or Intel

EDIT: Found an intel build (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ltGY9N2C9Y)

Also, buy from newegg not amazon
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 22, 2013, 09:53:49 pm
Hate to steal the thread, but I have a friend who wants a new computer and is intent on building one from scratch.
He is asking me to help and all he has picked out is the case and he doesn't even know what he wants, just that is budget is $700 and that he wants me to shop for him. :'(

The issue is I can only take care of most of it, the issue I have is the motherboard and processor, I don't know how to check if they are compatible or not.
I just need to be taught on that, but if somebody wants to pull up a build for me to show him, within his price range and is able to run a game like SWTOR on medium, that'd be good too. :D

Perhaps check this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUVhoixX-uE) Its an AMD Build, not sure if he wanted that or Intel

EDIT: Found an intel build (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ltGY9N2C9Y)

Also, buy from newegg not amazon

Thanks, and I told him from Newegg only, he was pulling links from several sites, a few from E-Bay. :D
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: CobraKill on July 22, 2013, 10:41:42 pm
Blaze. When shopping for a motherboard and CPU, there's three things to look for: One. Often the motherboard listing will say the generation it's compatible with. Two. Look for the chipsets. 4th gen Intels (Haswell) uses Z87. Three. Look for the sockets. Intels 4th Gen Haswells use socket LGA1150.

Look at the supercombos that have a motherboard and CPU. You can make sure there compatible then.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 23, 2013, 12:52:31 am
Blaze. When shopping for a motherboard and CPU, there's three things to look for: One. Often the motherboard listing will say the generation it's compatible with. Two. Look for the chipsets. 4th gen Intels (Haswell) uses Z87. Three. Look for the sockets. Intels 4th Gen Haswells use socket LGA1150.

Look at the supercombos that have a motherboard and CPU. You can make sure there compatible then.

Thanks, this will be useful for me when I decide to upgrade my motherboard and processor in the distant future.
I also plan on getting a 7950 and using Crossfire with it and my 7770 and just have it all on max settings forever and ever. ::)
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 23, 2013, 04:25:30 am
Hate to steal the thread, but I have a friend who wants a new computer and is intent on building one from scratch.
He is asking me to help and all he has picked out is the case and he doesn't even know what he wants, just that is budget is $700 and that he wants me to shop for him. :'(

The issue is I can only take care of most of it, the issue I have is the motherboard and processor, I don't know how to check if they are compatible or not.
I just need to be taught on that, but if somebody wants to pull up a build for me to show him, within his price range and is able to run a game like SWTOR on medium, that'd be good too. :D

Perhaps check this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUVhoixX-uE) Its an AMD Build, not sure if he wanted that or Intel

EDIT: Found an intel build (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ltGY9N2C9Y)

Also, buy from newegg not amazon

Thanks, and I told him from Newegg only, he was pulling links from several sites, a few from E-Bay. :D

Blaze, if he has decided on a specific case for some reason or other, then a good place to start is with the form factor motherboard that will fit the case.

While Newegg is usually the best place to shop, there is nothing necessarily wrong with looking around. Good savings can be had at places like eBay.

After he has decided ion the case, then he should get a good processor and graphics card for the budget he has. Usually, AMD gets you a nice processor for a lot less than Intel, but the performance is a tad less than Intel processors.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 23, 2013, 08:39:54 am
Hate to steal the thread, but I have a friend who wants a new computer and is intent on building one from scratch.
He is asking me to help and all he has picked out is the case and he doesn't even know what he wants, just that is budget is $700 and that he wants me to shop for him. :'(

The issue is I can only take care of most of it, the issue I have is the motherboard and processor, I don't know how to check if they are compatible or not.
I just need to be taught on that, but if somebody wants to pull up a build for me to show him, within his price range and is able to run a game like SWTOR on medium, that'd be good too. :D

Perhaps check this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUVhoixX-uE) Its an AMD Build, not sure if he wanted that or Intel

EDIT: Found an intel build (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ltGY9N2C9Y)

Also, buy from newegg not amazon

Thanks, and I told him from Newegg only, he was pulling links from several sites, a few from E-Bay. :D

Blaze, if he has decided on a specific case for some reason or other, then a good place to start is with the form factor motherboard that will fit the case.

While Newegg is usually the best place to shop, there is nothing necessarily wrong with looking around. Good savings can be had at places like eBay.

After he has decided ion the case, then he should get a good processor and graphics card for the budget he has. Usually, AMD gets you a nice processor for a lot less than Intel, but the performance is a tad less than Intel processors.

I showed him the link to the AMD build lich posted (he prefers AMD), and he likes whats in that and it's in his budget.
The main thing he likes is that since somebody else has used it he knows it'll work together.
All that remains now is finding the same parts as cheap as can be found.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 23, 2013, 09:46:14 am
Maximum PC is an online magazine that caters to gamers. They have frequently-updated lists of computers within specific price brackets.

Then it's merely a waiting game for the component prices to fluctuate or to be offered in bundles to assemble your dream computer. :)
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 23, 2013, 09:51:42 am
I'm out of town. Will look at it when I return.

Ok, no rush. I won't accually get to build one in a few months minamum, just trying to get used of putting parts together that work...

Your build was weird. You chose a much inferior PSU with weaker output at the same time that you increased the video card power draw. Same thing for the motherboard.  The previous model had more USB 3.0, and more PCI-e 3.0 slots. Have not looked much at the case, but that's getting to low-down pricing and sometimes at that price level things get a bit nasty. Room for a water cooler might be one problem.

Only now did I notice that the previous "final" build did not include a CPU! :D

My recommendation is you use a spreadsheet. Then you won't forget some components. Google has nice online spreadsheets if you have no other access to one.  Libre Office also provides an open-source version.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Blaze on July 23, 2013, 02:00:22 pm
Maximum PC is an online magazine that caters to gamers. They have frequently-updated lists of computers within specific price brackets.

Then it's merely a waiting game for the component prices to fluctuate or to be offered in bundles to assemble your dream computer. :)

My dad brought one of those home about four years ago.
The build price was a little under $1000 and probably not much better than my current computer, saying it is, I'm not entirely sure...
It's under my dresser which I don't use seeing as I have all my clothes in a big pile in front of it preventing me from getting to the corner it's under.
I might dig it back out and list what it had on it if anybody cared about it. :D

Edit: Ooh, online magazine..?
Never heard of those.

Anyhow what I said still stands, I have some sort of computer magazine under my dresser and whatnot.
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 23, 2013, 07:09:56 pm
I'm out of town. Will look at it when I return.

Ok, no rush. I won't accually get to build one in a few months minamum, just trying to get used of putting parts together that work...

Your build was weird. You chose a much inferior PSU with weaker output at the same time that you increased the video card power draw. Same thing for the motherboard.  The previous model had more USB 3.0, and more PCI-e 3.0 slots. Have not looked much at the case, but that's getting to low-down pricing and sometimes at that price level things get a bit nasty. Room for a water cooler might be one problem.

Only now did I notice that the previous "final" build did not include a CPU! :D

My recommendation is you use a spreadsheet. Then you won't forget some components. Google has nice online spreadsheets if you have no other access to one.  Libre Office also provides an open-source version.

Accually the CPU was out of that shot but was in it afterwards, the cart hand't refreshed on that page :P

EDIT: Graunaid Got a recomendation on a ~200-400 dollar GPU?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 24, 2013, 07:30:42 pm
With my question unanswered in the previous post i just chose one. Lets see what this build does...
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 24, 2013, 07:47:31 pm
With my question unanswered in the previous post i just chose one. Lets see what this build does...

Sorry, if you edit a post after I viewed it, it does not show up in my list of unread posts. Will look at your build. The price range you have is from good to pretty neat. Wide list of choices in that price range. Want to narrow it down maybe to a $50 upper/lower limit?
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: lich98 on July 24, 2013, 08:08:40 pm
With my question unanswered in the previous post i just chose one. Lets see what this build does...

Sorry, if you edit a post after I viewed it, it does not show up in my list of unread posts. Will look at your build. The price range you have is from good to pretty neat. Wide list of choices in that price range. Want to narrow it down maybe to a $50 upper/lower limit?
$200-250
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 24, 2013, 09:14:58 pm
$200-250

The GTX 660 you configured is the overclocked version and has awesome performance - for less than your $200 price range. The problem with many of these versions is that you have to find a site that reliably benchmarks them against other "known" cards to get a feel for how they stack up.

Here is the Passmark site with more or less a reference for each card: http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html

But they don't break out the OC and SC variants, for instance.

Here is a review of the model you configured: http://www.legitreviews.com/article/2023/10/ (Not my favorite site, but you have to take what you can get.)

I absolutely love the MSI Twin Frozer series - I have two of their Radeon HD cards, a new HD 7770 (got it for about $80) and an older HD 7950 which I bought in late Dec 2011 or maybe early 2012. They are quiet as anything, run everything I need and I've not yet had to overclock them.

I think lately Nvidia is better value for money than Radeon, so your choice there is solid as well.

Note that the newer, and better performing GTX 660 Ti is still in your $250 price range. As is the Radeon HD 7950 after rebates. :)

Short list of cards and rough price in your range.

Card3D MarkPrice
GeForce GTX 660 Ti   4,694$249.99
Radeon HD 79504,617$269.99
Radeon HD 78704,247$219.00
GeForce GTX 6604,111$194.99
Radeon HD 78503,701$148.46
Radeon HD 77702,156$114.99
Title: Re: Building a computer
Post by: Grauniad on July 24, 2013, 09:22:46 pm
Lich98: Also, you are short-changing yourself on RAM. Don't get less than 16GB.

Edit:

This thread is such a catch-all, with the new category, I'm going to lock this thread. Please start a new thread.